Public Notice Japanese-Style

The Golden Hall and five-storey pagoda of Hōryū-ji, among the oldest wooden buildings in the world, National Treasures, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site

The Golden Hall and five-storey pagoda of Hōryū-ji, among the oldest wooden buildings in the world, National Treasures, and a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Japan, though an island nation, has not remained apart from the world of the web.  See Xinxin Yang’s full report about public notice in Japan.  Below are just some highlights.

  • Internet users (per 100 people) in Japan was measured at 79% in 2012, according to the International Telecommunication Union report[1] and the Word Bank report[2].
  • The government has steadily made efforts to expand the utilization of online services as a main part of the e-Government initiative since 1999. Japan e-government was founded from 2001 the “E-Japan Strategy”, then further developed under the “IT New Reform Strategy”, and “i-Japan Strategy 2015.”
  •  There are many public services (information, document archive, search, application etc.) categories: “Information on the Great East Japan Earthquake,” “Government documents search”, “e Application”, “Law/Regulation search”. The websites also try to attract citizens to be active on public issues.
  •  Public notice in Japan is more likely to be called as “public announcement.” Japan government provide very clear, dated archives.

[1] Percentage of Individuals using the Internet 2000-2012, report from International Telecommunication Union, www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/…/Individuals_Internet_2000-2012.xls, retrieved March 25, 2014.

[2] http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/IT.NET.USER.P2, retrieved March 26, 2014

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